CREATURE OVERVIEW

Creature Description

Each creature is organized in the same general format, as described in the following text. Much of the information on a creature is condensed into a creature statistics block, the contents of which are explained below.

Challenge Rating (CR)

A creature’s Challenge Rating provides a rough measure of the creature’s toughness in a combat situation. As a rule of thumb, four heroes of a level equal to the creature’s Challenge Rating should exhaust roughly one-quarter of their resources battling it. But situations may arise where a creature’s Challenge Rating does not accurately reflect the difficulty of the challenge.

Size

A creature falls into one of nine size categories. The size categories are briefly described in Table: Creature Sizes. Each size category includes a size modifier that applies to the creature’s Defense and attack rolls; a modifier that applies to grapple checks; and a modifier that applies to Hide checks. These modifiers have been figured into the statistics for the creatures described here.

Type

A creature’s type determines many of its characteristics and abilities: physical ability scores, Hit Die type, base attack bonus, saving throw bonuses, skill points, feats, and special qualities. Mental ability scores (Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma) can vary widely among creatures of a type; unless a type description specifies a particular score for one of these abilities, the GM will assign values as he or she deems appropriate.

Hit Dice (HD) and Hit Points (hp)

A creature’s type and size determine its Hit Dice. A creature’s Hit Dice is equivalent to its level for determining how various FX abilities affect the creature, its rate of natural healing, and its maximum ranks in a skill.

A creature’s Hit Dice and Constitution modifier determine its hit points. A creature’s entry gives the creature’s average hit points.

Massive Damage Threshold (Mas)

When a creature takes damage from a single attack equal to or greater than its current Constitution, it must succeed on a Fortitude save (DC 15) or immediately drop to –1 hit points. If the damage would reduce the creature to –1 hit points or fewer anyway, the massive damage threshold does not apply, and the creature does not need to make a Fortitude save.

Constructs, elementals, oozes, plants, and undead ignore the effects of massive damage and do not have massive damage thresholds. Vermin gain a +5 species bonus on their Fortitude saves to avoid falling to –1 hit points.

Initiative (Init)

The creature’s modifier on initiative checks is usually equal to its Dexterity modifier, although the Improved Initiative feat provides an additional +4 bonus.

Speed (Spd)

A creature’s tactical speed on land is the amount of distance it can cover in one move action. If the creature wears armor that reduces its speed, this fact is given along with a parenthetical note indicating the armor type; the creature’s base unarmored speed follows.

If the creature has other modes of movement, these are given after the main entry. Unless noted otherwise, modes of movement are natural (not magical).

Burrow: The creature can tunnel through dirt, but not through rock unless the descriptive text says otherwise. Creatures cannot run while burrowing.

Climb: A creature with a climb speed has the Climb skill at no cost and gains a +8 species bonus on Climb checks. The creature must make a Climb check to climb any wall or slope with a DC greater than 0, but it always can choose to take 10, even if rushed or threatened while climbing. The creature climbs at the given speed while climbing. If it attempts an accelerated climb, it moves at double the given climb speed (or its normal land speed, whichever is less) and makes a single Climb check at a –5 penalty. Creatures cannot use the run action while climbing. The creature retains its Dexterity bonus to Defense (if any) while climbing, and opponents get no special bonus on their attack rolls against the climbing creature.

Fly: The creature can fly at the given speed if carrying no more than a medium load. All fly speeds include a parenthetical note indicating maneuverability:

Perfect: The creature can perform almost any aerial maneuver it wishes.

Good: The creature is agile in the air, but cannot change direction as readily as one with perfect maneuverability.

Average: The creature can fly as adroitly as a small bird.

Poor: The creature flies as well as a very large bird.

Clumsy: The creature can barely fly at all.

Creatures that fly can make dive attacks. A dive attack works just like a charge, but the diving creature must move a minimum of 30 feet. It can make only claw attacks, but these deal double damage. Creatures can use the run action while flying, provided they fly in a straight line.

Swim: A creature with a swim speed can move through water at the given speed without making Swim checks. It gains a +8 species bonus on any Swim check to perform some special action or avoid a hazard. The creature always can choose to take 10, even if distracted or endangered when swimming. Creatures can use the run action while swimming, provided they swim in a straight line.

Defense

A creature’s Defense includes a parenthetical mention of the modifiers contributing to it. The creature’s “touch” Defense (discounting natural armor and other armor modifiers) and “flatfooted” Defense (discounting Dexterity bonus and class bonus, if any) are provided as well.

Base Attack Bonus (BAB)

A creature’s base attack bonus does not include any modifiers. It is used to calculate a creature’s grapple modifier as well as the maximum bonus on damage rolls for a creature using the Power Attack feat. A creature’s base attack bonus is derived by cross-referencing the creature’s Hit Dice and type on Table: Creature Saves and Base Attack Bonuses.

Grapple Modifier (Grap)

Whenever a creature makes an opposed grapple check, apply this modifier to its d20 roll. The total modifier on grapple checks is determined as follows: base attack bonus + Strength modifier + grapple modifier. The grapple modifiers for creatures of various sizes are given in Table: Creature Sizes.

Primary Attack (Atk)

If a creature moves more than 5 feet in the same round it attacks, it makes only a single attack using its primary attack bonus. This bonus includes modifications for size and Strength (for melee attacks) or Dexterity (for ranged attacks). A creature with the Weapon Finesse feat can use its Dexterity modifier on its primary attack. The damage and primary weapon type are noted in parentheses.

A creature’s primary attack damage includes its full Strength modifier (1.5 times its Strength bonus if it is the creature’s sole attack).

Use the creature’s primary attack bonus whenever the creature makes an attack of opportunity.

Creatures can attack with natural weapons, manufactured weapons, or sometimes both.

Natural Weapons

Natural weapons include teeth, claws, horns, and the like. The number of attacks along with the weapon, attack bonus, and form of attack (melee or ranged) are provided in a creature’s entry. Unless noted otherwise, natural weapons threaten critical hits on a natural attack roll of 20.

If any attacks also cause some special effect other than damage, that information is given along with the damage. Unless noted otherwise, creatures deal double damage on critical hits.

Natural weapons have types just as other weapons do. The most common types are summarized below.

Bite: The creature attacks with its mouth, dealing piercing damage.

Claw or Rake: The creature rips with a sharp appendage, dealing slashing damage.

Gore: The creature spears the opponent with an antler, horn, or similar appendage, dealing piercing damage.

Slap or Slam: The creature batters opponents with an appendage, dealing bludgeoning damage.

Sting: The creature stabs with a stinger, dealing piercing damage. Stings are usually poisoned.

Manufactured Weapons

Creatures that use manufactured weapons follow the same rules as characters, including those for multiple attacks and two-weapon fighting penalties.

Full Attack (Full Atk)

A creature that takes no more than a 5-foot step during its turn can make a full attack using all of its natural weapons. A creature’s full attack includes both its primary attack and its secondary attacks (if any).

The primary attack bonus includes modifications for size and Strength (for melee attacks) or Dexterity (for ranged attacks). A creature with the Weapon Finesse feat can use its Dexterity modifier on melee attacks. A creature’s primary attack damage includes its full Strength modifier (1.5 times its Strength bonus if it is the creature’s sole attack or if the creature is wielding a two-handed melee weapon).

The remaining weapons are secondary attacks and take a –5 penalty on attack rolls. Creatures with the Multi-attack feat (see Feats, below) take only a –2 penalty on secondary attacks. Secondary attacks add only one-half the creature’s Strength bonus to the damage. Creatures that do not normally carry ranged weapons are still given a ranged attack bonus for situations in which they might be throwing objects at a target.

Fighting Space (FS)

Fighting space approximates the amount of space a creature needs to move and fight effectively, and how much space it occupies on a grid of 5-foot-by-5-foot squares. Table: Creature Sizes gives the fighting space for creatures of any given size, although variations and exceptions are possible.

Reach

A creature’s reach is the distance at which it can strike targets with its natural weapons without needing to adjust its position on the grid. A creature using its natural weapons threatens all squares within its reach. When measuring diagonally, every second square counts as two squares. Table: Creature Sizes provides the typical reach for creatures of any given size. The GM may adjust the values in the table by –5 feet or +5 feet for creatures that have less than normal or greater than normal reach. Unlike the wielder of a reach weapon, a creature with greater than normal reach (more than 5 feet) can still strike creatures next to it. A creature with greater than normal reach usually gets an attack of opportunity against a character if the character approaches it, because the character enters a square it threatens before he or she can attack it. (This does not apply if the character takes a 5-foot step.) Large or larger creatures with reach weapons can strike targets out to double their reach but can’t strike at targets within their normal reach or less.

A creature with a 0-foot reach must move into the fighting space of its target to attack it, provoking an attack of opportunity from the target as the creature enters the target’s fighting space and threatened area. Also, creatures with 0-foot reach do not threaten the squares around them.

Special Qualities (SQ)

Many creatures have unusual abilities. A special quality can be extraordinary (Ex), spell-like (Sp), or supernatural (Su). Extraordinary: Extraordinary abilities are non-magical and are not subject to anything that disrupts magic. Using an extraordinary ability is a free action unless noted otherwise. Spell-Like: Spell-like abilities are magical and work just like spells, though they have no verbal, somatic, material, focus, or XP components. They are subject to spell resistance.

Spell-like abilities usually have a limit on the number of times they can be used. A spell-like ability that can be used “at will” has no use limit. Using a spell-like ability is an attack action unless noted otherwise, and doing so while threatened provokes attacks of opportunity. A spell-like ability can be disrupted just as a spell can be.

For creatures with spell-like abilities, a designated caster level serves to define how difficult it is to dispel their spell-like effects and to define any level-dependent variable the abilities might have. The creature’s caster level never affects which spell-like abilities the creature has; sometimes the given caster level is lower than the level a spellcasting character would need to cast the spell of the same name.

The saving throw (if any) for a spell-like ability is 10 + the level of the spell the ability resembles or duplicates + the creature’s Charisma modifier.

Supernatural: Supernatural abilities are magical but are not subject to spell resistance. Using a supernatural ability is an attack action unless noted otherwise. Supernatural abilities may have a use limit or be usable at will, just like spell-like abilities. However, supernatural abilities do not provoke attacks of opportunity and never require Concentration checks.

Allegiances (AL)

This entry lists the creature’s most likely allegiances, in order from most important to least important. Fantastic creatures often have allegiances to a moral or ethical philosophy as well as allegiances to masters, groups, organizations, owners, or creators.

Saves (SV)

A creature’s Fortitude, Reflex, and Will saving throw modifiers take into account the creature’s type, ability score modifiers, feats, and any special qualities.

Action Points (AP)

Creatures have no action points. However, creatures can gain action points by taking levels in a heroic character class. Every time a creature picks up a heroic class level, it gains a number of action points equal to 5 + one-half its heroic character level (not counting the creature’s starting Hit Dice). Like most heroic characters, however, creatures with heroic class levels will have spent a certain number of action points in the course of their “heroic” careers.

Assume that a creature has a number of action points remaining equal to one-half of its heroic class levels.

Reputation (Rep)

A creature has a Reputation bonus of +0 but may increase the bonus by taking levels in a character class.

Abilities

Creatures have the same six ability scores as characters: Strength (Str), Dexterity (Dex), Constitution (Con), Intelligence (Int), Wisdom (Wis), Charisma (Cha). Exceptions are noted below.

Strength: Quadrupeds can carry heavier loads than bipedal characters. See Carrying Capacity.

Intelligence: A creature can speak all the languages mentioned in its descriptive text. Any creature with an Intelligence score of 3 or higher understands at least one language.

Non-abilities: Some creatures lack certain ability scores. These creatures do not have an ability score of 0—they lack the ability altogether. The modifier for a non-ability is +0. Other effects of non-abilities are as follows.

Strength: Any creature that can physically manipulate other objects has at least 1 point of Strength. A creature with no Strength score can’t exert force, usually because it has no physical body or because it is immobile. The creature automatically fails Strength checks. If the creature can attack, it applies its Dexterity modifier to its base attack bonus instead of a Strength modifier.

Dexterity: Any creature that can move has at least 1 point of - Dexterity. A creature with no Dexterity score can’t move. If it can act (such as by casting spells), the creature applies its Intelligence modifier instead of its Dexterity modifier to initiative checks. The creature fails all Reflex saves and Dexterity checks.

Constitution: Any living creature has at least 1 point of - Constitution. A creature with no Constitution has no body or no metabolism. It is immune to any effect that requires a Fortitude save unless the effect works on objects or is harmless. The creature is also immune to ability damage, ability drain, and energy drain, and it always fails Constitution checks.

Intelligence: Any creature that can think, learn, or remember has at least 1 point of Intelligence. A creature with no Intelligence score is an automaton, operating on simple instincts or programmed instructions. It is immune to all mind-affecting effects and automatically fails Intelligence checks.

Wisdom: Any creature that can perceive its environment in any fashion has at least 1 point of Wisdom. Anything with no Wisdom score is an object, not a creature. Anything without a Wisdom score also has no Charisma score.

Charisma: Any creature capable of telling the difference between itself and things that are not itself has at least 1 point of Charisma. Anything with no Charisma score is an object, not a creature. Anything without a Charisma score also has no Wisdom score.

Special Abilities

Ability Score Reduction (Su): Some attacks reduce an opponent’s score in one or more abilities. This loss can be permanent or temporary

Permanent Ability Drain: This effect permanently reduces a living opponent’s ability score when the creature hits with a melee attack. The creature’s descriptive text gives the ability and the amount drained. If an attack that causes permanent ability drain scores a critical hit, it drains twice the given amount (if the damage is expressed as a die range, roll two dice). A draining creature heals 5 points of damage (10 on a critical hit) whenever it drains an ability score no matter how many points it drains. If the amount of healing is more than the damage the creature has taken, it gains any excess as temporary hit points.

Some ability drain attacks allow a Fortitude save with a DC of 10 +1/2 draining creature’s HD + draining creature’s Charisma modifier (the exact DC is given in the creature’s descriptive text). If no saving throw is mentioned, none is allowed.

Temporary Ability Damage:This attack damages an opponent’s ability score. The creature’s descriptive text gives the ability and the amount of damage. If an attack that causes ability damage scores a critical hit, it deals twice the given amount (if the damage is expressed as a die range, roll two dice). Temporary ability damage returns at the rate of 1 point per day.

Blind-sight (Ex): Using non-visual senses, such as sensitivity to vibrations, scent, acute hearing, or echolocation, the creature maneuvers and fights as well as a sighted creature. Invisibility and darkness are irrelevant. The ability’s range is specified in the creature’s descriptive text. The creature usually does not need to make Spot or Listen checks to notice creatures within range of its blind-sight ability.

Breath Weapon (Su): A breath weapon attack usually causes damage and is often based on some type of energy. It allows a Reflex save for half damage with a DC equal to 10 + ½ breathing creature’s HD + breathing creature’s Constitution modifier (the exact DC is given in the creature’s Species Traits). A creature is immune to its own breath weapon and those of others of its kind unless noted otherwise.

Constrict (Ex): The creature crushes the opponent, dealing bludgeoning damage, after making a successful grapple check. The amount of damage is given in the creature’s entry. If the creature also has the improved grab ability (see below), it deals constriction damage in addition to damage dealt by the weapon used to grab.

Damage Reduction (Su): The creature ignores damage from most weapons and natural attacks. Wounds heal immediately, or the weapon bounces off harmlessly (in either case, the opponent knows the attack was ineffective). The creature takes normal damage from energy attacks (even non-magical ones), spells, spell-like abilities, and supernatural abilities. A magic weapon or a creature with its own damage reduction can sometimes damage the creature normally, as noted below.

The entry indicates the amount of damage ignored and the type of weapon that negates the ability.

Any weapon more powerful than the type listed in the note also negates the ability. A weapon with an enhancement bonus due to magic is considered more powerful than any weapon that does not have such a bonus.

For purposes of harming other creatures with damage reduction, a creature’s natural weapons count as the type that ignores its own innate damage reduction. However, damage reduction from spells does not confer this ability. The amount of damage reduction is irrelevant.

Dark-vision (Ex): The creature can see in total darkness, out to the specified range (usually 60 feet). Dark-vision is black-and-white only, but is otherwise like normal light.

Energy Drain (Su): This attack saps a living opponent’s vital energy. With each successful melee attack, the creature bestows one or more negative levels. If an attack that includes an energy drain scores a critical hit, it drains double the given amount. For each negative level inflicted on an opponent, the draining creature heals 5 points of damage. If the amount of healing is more than the damage the creature has taken, it gains any excess as temporary hit points that remain for a maximum of 1 hour.

For each negative level, the opponent takes a –1 penalty on all skill checks and ability checks, attack rolls, and saving throws, and loses one effective level or Hit Die (whenever level is used in a die roll or calculation). A character with spell-casting ability loses the ability to cast one spell of the highest level he or she can cast (player’s choice); this loss persists until the negative level is removed.

Negative levels remain until 24 hours have passed or until removed with a spell. If a negative level is not removed before 24 hours have passed, the afflicted opponent must attempt a Fortitude save with a DC of 10 + 1/2 draining creature’s HD + draining creature’s Charisma modifier (the exact DC is given in the creature’s Species Traits). On a success, the negative level goes away with no harm to the creature. On a failure, the negative level goes away, but the creature’s level is reduced by one. A separate saving throw is required for each negative level. A creature that loses all of its levels or Hit Dice dies and, depending on the source of the energy drain, might rise as an undead creature of some kind.

Fast Healing (Ex): The creature regains hit points at an exceptionally fast rate, usually 1 or more hit points per round. Fast healing stops working when a creature is reduced to –10 hp or fewer. Except as noted here, fast healing works just like natural healing.

Fast healing doesn’t provide any benefit against attack forms that don’t deal hit point damage. Fast healing also doesn’t restore hit points lost to starvation, thirst, or suffocation, and it doesn’t allow a creature to re-grow or reattach severed body parts.

Fear Aura (Su): A fear aura either operates continuously or can be used at will. In either case, it’s a free action. This ability can freeze an opponent or cause opponents to become panicked. Other effects are possible. Negating the fear effect requires a successful Will save with a DC equal to 10 + 1/2 fearsome creature’s HD + fearsome creature’s Charisma modifier (the exact DC is given in the creature’s descriptive text). Gaze (Su): A gaze attack takes effect when opponents look at the creature’s eyes. The attack can have almost any sort of effect: petrifaction, death, charm, and so on. The typical range is 30 feet, but check the creature’s entry for details. The type of saving throw for a gaze attack varies, but it is usually a Will or Fortitude save. The DC is equal to 10 + 1/2 gazing creature’s HD + gazing creature’s Charisma modifier (the exact DC is given in the creature’s Species Traits). A successful saving throw negates the effect.

Each opponent within range of the gaze attack must attempt a saving throw each round at the beginning of his or her turn.

Opponents can avoid the saving throw by averting their eyes or by using a barrier to sight.

Averting One’s Eyes:The opponent avoids looking at the creature’s face and instead looks at its body, watching its shadow, tracking it in a reflective surface, or the like. Each round, the opponent has a 50% chance to not need to make a saving throw against the gaze attack. The creature with the gaze attack, however, gains one-half concealment against that opponent.

Barrier to Sight:An opponent that cannot see the creature at all cannot be affected by its gaze attack. This can be accomplished by turning one’s back on the creature, shutting one’s eyes, or wearing a blindfold or head covering that prevents sight. The creature with the gaze attack gains total concealment against the opponent.

A creature with a gaze attack can actively gaze as an attack action by choosing a target within range. That opponent must attempt a saving throw but can try to avoid the gaze as described above. Thus, a target may need to save against a creature’s gaze twice during the same round: once before the target’s action and once during the creature’s turn.

A creature is immune to its own gaze attack unless otherwise noted.

Improved Grab (Ex): If the creature hits with a melee weapon it deals normal damage and attempts to start a grapple as a free action, doing so without provoking attacks of opportunity. No initial touch attack is required. Unless otherwise stated, improved grab works only against opponents at least one size category smaller than the creature. A Small or smaller creature using improved grab does not apply its grapple modifier to its grapple check.

The creature has the option to conduct the grapple normally, or simply use the part of its body it used in the improved grab to hold the opponent. If it chooses to do the latter, it takes a –20 penalty on grapple checks but is not considered grappled itself; the creature does not lose its Dexterity bonus to Defense, still threatens an area, and can use its remaining attacks against other opponents.

A successful hold does not deal additional damage unless the creature also has the constrict ability (see above). If the creature  does not constrict, each successful grapple check it makes during successive rounds automatically deals the damage given for the attack that established the hold.

When a creature gets a hold after an improved grab attack, it pulls the opponent into its space. This act does not provoke attacks of opportunity. The creature is not considered grappled while it holds the opponent, so it still threatens adjacent squares and retains its Dexterity bonus. It can even move, provided it can drag the opponent’s weight.

Low-Light Vision (Ex): A creature with low-light vision can see twice as far as normal in poor lightning conditions. The creature can still distinguish colors, even in dim lighting.

Poison (Ex): Poison attacks deal initial damage, such as temporary ability damage (see above) or some other effect, to the opponent on a failed Fortitude save. Unless otherwise noted, another saving throw is required 1 minute later (regardless of the first save’s result) to avoid secondary damage.

The Fortitude save against poison has a DC equal to 10 + ½ poisoning creature’s HD + poisoning creature’s Constitution modifier (the exact DC is given in the creature’s Species Traits). A successful save negates the damage.

Power Resistance (Ex): A creature with power resistance can avoid the effects of psionic powers that directly affect it. To determine whether a spell or spell-like ability works, the psionic power manifester must make a level check (1d20 + manifester’s level). If the result equals or exceeds the creature’s power resistance, the power works normally, although the creature is still allowed a saving throw.

Psionics (Sp): Psionics refers to abilities the creature generates with the power of its mind. Most psionic abilities can be used at will and have no use limit.

Regeneration (Ex): This ability makes the creature impervious to most types of damage. Any damage dealt to the creature that falls below its massive damage threshold doesn’t reduce its hit points, unless that damage is of a type it is specifically vulnerable to, as mentioned in the creature’s description.

Massive damage that doesn’t match the creature’s vulnerability reduces its hit points, but such damage automatically heals at a fixed rate, as detailed in the creature’s description. When the creature takes massive damage from an attack type it isn’t vulnerable to, a failed save renders it dazed for 1 round (instead of reducing it to –1 hit points).

Damage the creature is vulnerable to deals damage with every successful attack. Such damage can’t be regenerated, and massive damage from such an attack follows the normal massive damage rules.

Regeneration doesn’t provide any benefit against attack forms that don’t deal hit point damage. Regeneration also doesn’t restore hit points lost to starvation, thirst, or suffocation. Regenerating creatures can re-grow and reattach severed body parts. Severed parts that aren’t reattached wither and die normally. Regeneration continues to work no matter how low the creature’s hit points drop, restoring lost hit points from any damage other than from attack forms the creature is specially vulnerable to.

Resistance to Energy (Ex): The creature ignores some damage of the given energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic/concussion) each time the creature is subjected to such damage. The entry indicates the amount and type of damage ignored.

Scent (Ex): This ability allows the creature to detect approaching enemies, sniff out hidden foes, and track by sense of smell. Creatures with the scent ability can identify familiar odors just as humans do familiar sights.

The creature can detect opponents within 30 feet by sense of smell. If the opponent is upwind, the range increases to 60 feet; if downwind, it drops to 15 feet. Strong scents can be detected at twice the ranges noted above. Overpowering scents can be detected at triple normal range.

When a creature detects a scent, the exact location is not revealed—only its presence somewhere within range. The creature can take a move or attack action to note the direction of the scent. If it moves within 5 feet of the source, the creature can pinpoint that source.

A creature with the scent ability can follow tracks by smell, making a Wisdom check to find or follow a track. The typical DC for a fresh trail is 10 (no matter what kind of surface holds the scent). This DC increases or decreases depending on the strength of the quarry’s odor, the number of creatures being tracked, and the age of the trail. For each hour that the trail is cold, the DC increases by 2. The ability otherwise follows the rules for the Track feat. Creatures tracking by scent ignore the effects of surface conditions and poor visibility.

Spell Resistance (Ex): A creature with spell resistance can avoid the effects of spells and spell-like abilities that directly affect it. To determine whether a spell or spell-like ability works, the Spell-caster must make a level check (1d20 + caster level). If the result equals or exceeds the creature’s spell resistance, the spell works normally, although the creature is still allowed a saving throw.

Spells (Sp): Some creatures can cast arcane spells or divine spells (and can activate magic items accordingly). These creatures are subject to the same spell-casting rules as characters. Spell-casting creatures are not members of an advanced class unless their entries say so, and they do not gain any class features. A creature with access to divine spells must prepare them in the normal manner.

Swallow Whole (Ex): If the creature begins its turn with an opponent held in its mouth (see improved grab, above), it can attempt a new grapple check (as though attempting to pin the opponent). If it succeeds, it swallows its opponent and deals bite damage. Unless noted otherwise, the opponent can be up to one size category smaller than the swallowing creature.

Being swallowed has various consequences depending on the creature, but a swallowed opponent is considered grappled, while the creature is not. A swallowed opponent can try to cut its way free with any light piercing or slashing weapon (the amount of cutting damage required to get free is noted in the creature’s descriptive text), or it can just try to escape the grapple. If the swallowed opponent chooses the latter course, success puts it back in the creature’s mouth, where it may be bitten or swallowed again.

Trample (Ex): As an attack action during its turn each round, the creature can run over an opponent at least one size category smaller than itself, entering the opponent’s fighting space to do so. The trample deals bludgeoning damage, and the creature’s descriptive text lists the amount.

Trampled opponents can attempt attacks of opportunity, but these incur a –4 penalty. If they do not make attacks of opportunity, trampled opponents can attempt Reflex saves for half damage. The save DC equals 10 + 1/2 trampling creature’s HD + trampling creature’s Strength modifier (the exact DC is given in the creature’s descriptive text).

Turn Resistance (Ex): The creature (usually undead) resists attempts by divine spell-casters to turn it (see Turn or Rebuke Undead). When resolving a turn or rebuke attempt, add the given bonus to the creature’s Hit Dice total.

Skills

This section lists alphabetically all the creature’s skills by name along with skill modifiers that include adjustments for ability scores and any bonuses from feats orspecies abilities (unless otherwise noted in the descriptive text). All listed skills were purchased as class skills unless the creature acquires a character class (see Advancement, below).

Automatic Languages: Some creatures read, write, or speak unique languages that heroes don’t know anything about. The GM determines whether a hero is capable of learning one of these unique languages and the method by which that language can be learned.

Feats

This section lists alphabetically all the creature’s feats. Most creatures use the same feats that are available to characters, but some have access to the Multi-attack feat (described below).

Multiattack

The creature is adept at using all its natural weapons at once.

Prerequisite: Three or more natural weapons.

Benefit: The creature’s secondary attacks with natural weapons take only a –2 penalty.

Normal: Without this feat, the creature’s secondary natural attacks take a –5 penalty.

Advancement

The GM can improve a creature by increasing its Hit Dice. The Advancement entry indicates the increased Hit Dice (and often size) of the creature or indicates that the creature can advance by character class.

Increasing Hit Dice

As a creature gains Hit Dice, many of its game statistics change. Size: Adding Hit Dice to a creature can also increase its size. An increase in size affects a creature’s Defense, attack rolls, and grapple checks, as shown on Table: Creature Sizes, as well as physical ability scores and damage, as shown in the descriptions of the creature types.

Defense: An increase in size affects a creature’s Defense, as shown on Table: Creature Sizes. An increase in size might also improve a creature’s natural armor bonus to Defense, as shown on Table: Adjustments to Physical Abilities and Natural Armor. Note that a natural armor bonus stacks with an equipment bonus from armor.

Attack Bonus: Table: Creature Saves and Base Attack Bonuses shows how a creature’s base attack bonus improves as it gains Hit Dice. A change in the creature’s size also modifies its attack rolls, as shown on Table: Creature Sizes. Both values must be counted when recalculating a creature’s attack bonus.

Grapple Modifier: An increase in size affects a creature’s grapple modifier, as shown on Table: Creature Sizes.

Damage: An increase in size also increases the amount of damage a creature deals with its natural weapons.

Saving Throws: Table: Creature Saves and Base Attack Bonuses shows how a creature’s saving throw bonuses improve as it gains Hit Dice.

Ability Scores: An increase in size affects a creature’s Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution, as shown on Table: Adjustments to Physical Abilities and Natural Armor.

Skills and Feats: As shown on Table: Bonus Skill Points and Feats by Creature Type, a creature may gain additional skill points and feats depending on its type.

Natural Armor Old Size1 Natural Armor New Size Str Dex Con Improvement
Fine Diminutive –2
Diminutive Tiny +2 –2
Tiny Small +4 –2
Small Medium-size +4 –2 +2
Medium-size Large +8 –2 +4 +2
Large Huge +8 –2 +4 +3
Huge Gargantuan +8 +4 +4
Gargantuan Colossal +8 +4 +5

1 Repeat the adjustment if the creature moves up more than one size category.

Type Bonus Skill Points Bonus Feats
Aberration +2 per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Animal
Construct
Dragon 6 + Int modifier per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Elemental +2 per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Fey +2 per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Giant +2 per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Humanoid +1 per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Magical beast +1 per extra HD* +1 per 4 extra HD

Monstrous humanoid +2 per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Ooze
Outsider 8 + Int modifier per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Plant
Undead +2 per extra HD +1 per 4 extra HD
Vermin

*Magical beasts with an Intelligence of 1 or 2 gain no bonus skills as they advance.

Acquiring a Character Class

A creature that acquires a character class follows the rules for multiclass characters. The creature’s character level equals its Hit Dice plus the number of character class levels it has.

Creatures with 1 or fewer Hit Dice count only their character class levels.

Size: Adding character classes to a creature never affects its size.

Skills: Creatures thattake levels of a character class do not gain as many skill points as a human character of the same class. Creatures get 4 fewer skill points at 1st level than a human character and 1 fewer skill point each level thereafter; see Table: Skill Points per Class Level for Nonhumans.

Feats: Creatures with 1 or fewer Hit Dice that acquire character class levels advance as human characters do, but they gain only one bonus feat at 1st level instead of two.

Talents and Abilities

Creatures that advance by character class gain special talents and abilities, which are noted here.

Basic Class Skill Points per Level *
Strong 2 + Int modifier
Fast 4 + Int modifier
Tough 2 + Int modifier
Smart 8 + Int modifier
Dedicated 4 + Int modifier
Charismatic 6 + Int modifier

*Humanoids with 1 or fewer Hit Dice advance as human characters do. At 1st level, multiply the number of skill points per level by 4.

Advanced Class Skill Points per Level Advanced Class Skill Points per Level
Soldier 4 + Int modifier Field Scientist 6 + Int modifier
Martial Artist 2 + Int modifier Techie 6 + Int modifier
Gunslinger 4 + Int modifier Field Medic 4 + Int modifier
Infiltrator 6 + Int modifier Investigator 4 + Int modifier
Daredevil 4 + Int modifier Personality 4 + Int modifier
Bodyguard 2 + Int modifier Negotiator 4 + Int modifier

Researching Creatures

Researching a creature and learning its weaknesses will increase the likelihood of victory in the ultimate confrontation. A hero can uncover secrets about a particular creature or type of creature through research. The success of any such endeavor is measured with Research skill checks.

Researching a creature takes 1d4 hours plus an additional 1d4 hours if the creature is unique or has traits unlike other members of its species. The type of information gleaned in this amount of time depends on the hero’s Research check result, as shown below.

Research Type of Information Check DC
Type Traits Reveals a creature’s type and any traits common to that type. 15
Species Traits Reveals a specific creature’s species traits. 20
Unique Traits Reveals the unique attributes and weaknesses (if any) of a specific creature. 25

Creature Weaknesses

Although a creature’s type and species determine many of its traits and abilities, GMs are encouraged to alter a creature’s physiology, behavior, abilities, tactics, and defenses when it serves the story or to confound players who think they know everything about their opponents.

The rules provided allow GMs to build custom monsters and ascribe special qualities to them. When designing a creature, the GM should also think of ways the creature can be defeated.

From the heroes’ point of view, a creature’s weaknesses are more important than its abilities. Assigning weaknesses to creatures gives under-powered or poorly equipped heroes a fighting chance.

Table: Sources of Weakness lists many sources to which a creature may be vulnerable. A source can be a specific object, location, substance, sound, sensation, or activity. How the creature interacts with a source of weakness is left up to the GM, although most sources must be in close proximity to the creature (if not touching the creature) to affect it. GMs may roll randomly on the table, choose a source that suits the creature, or devise their own.

Source Effects

After determining a creature’s source of weakness, the GM needs to decide how the creature reacts when confronted by the source. Pick an effect that seems appropriate for the creature and the source.

A creature gets either a Fortitude or Will saving throw to overcome or resist the source of weakness; the DC of the save varies depending on the source’s strength:

Strength of Source Save DC
Easily resistible 10
Moderate 15
Strong 20
Overpowering 25

Creatures usually react to a source of weakness in one of six ways:

Addiction: The creature is compelled to ingest, imbibe, or inhale the source. The source must be within 5 feet of the creature to affect it. On a successful Will save, the creature negates the compulsion. On a failed save, the creature spends a full-round action indulging its addiction, then may resume normal actions while suffering one or more of the following effects (GM’s choice):

Each effect lasts 1d4 hours. Even creatures immune to mind-affecting effects are susceptible to a source-induced addiction.

Attraction: The creature is compelled to move as fast as it can toward the source. On a successful Will save, the creature resists the compulsion. On a failed save, the creature moves toward the source at its maximum speed, taking the safest and most direct route. Once it reaches the source, the compelled creature seeks to possess it. If the source isn’t something the creature can easily possess, it gets a new save every round to break the compulsion.

Even creatures immune to mind-affecting effects are susceptible to a source-induced attraction.

Aversion: The creature finds the source repellant. On a failed save, the creature cannot approach or remain within 1d4 x10 feet of it. In the case of traveling sounds, the creature moves away from the source as fast as it can, stopping only when it can no longer hear it. On a successful Will save, the creature overcomes its aversion and may approach the source freely. A repelled creature that cannot move the requisite distance from the source suffers one or more of the following effects (GM’s choice):

Each effect lasts until the creature leaves the affected area and for 1d4 rounds afterward. Even creatures immune to mind-affecting effects are susceptible to a source-induced aversion.

Fascination: The creature finds the source fascinating and ceases all attacks and movement upon seeing, hearing, smelling, or otherwise perceiving it. On a successful Will save, the creature negates the fascination and can act normally. On a failed Will save, the creature can take no actions, and foes gain a +2 bonus on attack rolls against the creature. Any time the creature is attacked or takes damage, it gets a new save to negate the fascination. Otherwise, the fascination lasts as long as the creature can see, hear, smell, or otherwise perceive the source.

Even creatures immune to mind-affecting effects are susceptible to a source-induced fascination.

Fear: The creature is frightened by the source. If it fails its Will save, the creature flees from the source as fast as it can. If unable to flee, the creature takes a –2 morale penalty on attack rolls, weapon damage rolls, and saving throws. On a successful save, the creature overcomes the fear and can approach the source or otherwise act without penalty.

Even creatures immune to mind-affecting effects are susceptible to a source-induced fear.

Harm: Contact with the source or proximity to the source harms the creature in some fashion. On a successful Fortitude save, the creature negates the effect or, in the case of instant death or disintegration, takes damage instead. GMs may choose one of the following effects or invent their own:

Even creatures immune toeffects that require Fortitude saves are susceptible to source-induced harm.

d% Source d% Source d% Source
01 Alcohol or moonshine 33 Grave dirt 66–67 Plutonium
02 Amber 34–35 Heavy metal music 68 Poppies
03 Animated cartoons 36–37 Holy symbols 69 Pulsing strobe lights
04 Archways 38–39 Holy water 70–71 Radiation
05–06 Bells or chimes 40 Hospitals 72 Radio waves
07 Books written by William Blake 41 Ice cream 73 Rubber
08 Bunnies 42 Insecticide (DDT) 74 Running water
09–10 Cancerous organs 43 Jack o’-lanterns 75–76 Silver
11 Carbonated soft drinks 44 Keys 77 Sodium benzoate (food preservative)
12–13 Cats 45–46 Laughter of children 78–79 Sodium chloride (salt)
14 Chrome 47 Laundry detergent 80–81 Specific phrase or word
15–16 Classical music 48 Lavender 82 Specific song
17 Clocks 49 Lilac-scented candles 83 Spoken Latin
18 Clowns 50 Mathematical equations 84 Stuffed animals
19 Cocaine 51 Morphine 85 Sumerian or Egyptian hieroglyphs
20–21 Country music 52 –53 Nerve gas 86–87 Sunlight
22–23 Crosses or crucifixes 54 Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) 88–89 The Bible
24 Crows 55 Novocaine 90 Tinfoil
25 Dogs 56–57 Number “8” 91–92 Toxic waste
26 Elvis Presley memorabilia 58 Pearls 93–94 Triangles
27 Fast cars 59 Penicillin 95 Television infomercials
28 Fast foods 60 Photo flashes 96 Television static
29–30 Fluorescent lights 61–62 Plastic or vinyl 97–98 White rice
31 Games of chance 63–64 Played violin or electric guitar 99–100 X-rays
32 Gold or iron pyrite (fool’s gold) 65 Playgrounds